Nurse holding hand of senior woman in pension home

Is My Loved One with Alzheimer's Safe at Home?

Published in June/July 2017 Issue

Once a loved one is diagnosed with Alzheimer’s or a related condition, family must go into planning mode. What is the best way to care for their loved one? How will their loved one’s condition change over time? Is a nursing home the only solution?

Senior Female In Garden Using Walking Frame

Alzheimer's Caregivers List Wandering as a Top Concern

Published in June/July 2016 Issue


It happened in seconds. The phone rang while Maggie was carrying in the groceries with her mom, who has Alzheimer’s disease. By the time Maggie hung up on what proved to be a robocall, Mom was gone! Maggie was frantic. Luckily, she had alerted the neighbors that Mom was confused and tended to get lost. “Thank goodness,” she breathed as she spotted Mom coming down the sidewalk, assisted by a kind gentleman from the next block.

Young nurse and female senior in nursing home

When a Loved One Is Living with Chronic Illness, Home Care Can Help

Published in February 2014 Issue

In some cases, when a person's condition is medically complex, moving to a nursing home or other care facility is the best choice. But most people who are facing health challenges would rather stay in the familiar comfort of their own home. If your loved one is in this situation, home care can help.

Family May Notice Signs of Alzheimer's Disease During the Holidays

Published in December 2013 Issue

Everyone forgets a name or misplaces keys occasionally, and many healthy people are less able to remember certain kinds of information as they get older. But the symptoms of Alzheimer's disease are much more serious than simple memory lapses.

Mother and daughter

Communicating With Someone Who Has Memory Loss

Published in November 2013 Issue

When a friend or loved one is living with the challenges of Alzheimer's disease or another type of cognitive impairment, he or she may have trouble understanding or being understood by you. It helps to know the obstacles you both face, and what can be done to overcome them.

Young woman and her grandfather

For Patients with Memory Loss, Emotions Remain

Published in August 2013 Issue

A new study offers some good news for caregivers and other loved ones of individuals with Alzheimer's disease. The study shows that even if patients immediately forget a shared joke or a meaningful conversation, the warm feelings associated with the experience can stick around and boost their mood.

"Remember When...?" The Value of Reminiscing

Published in June 2013 Issue

All people reminisce. Remembering times past is a pleasant diversion, stimulates the mind, and helps give us perspective and a sense of who we are. As a study from the Association for Psychological Science stated, "Nostalgia is now emerging as a fundamental human strength."

Close-up of senior couple focusing on worried woman

Can a Close Caregiver Relationship Slow Alzheimer's Decline?

Published in June 2013 Issue

A study from Johns Hopkins Medicine suggests that a particularly close relationship with caregivers may give people with Alzheimer's disease an advantage when it comes to retaining mind and brain function over time. The beneficial effect of emotional intimacy was found to rival that of many drugs used to treat the disease.

Alzheimer's Disease Doesn't Take a Holiday

Published in December 2012 Issue

The bright lights, big crowds and bustle that make the holidays fun for most of us often do just the opposite for people with Alzheimer's and those who care for them.

When to Worry About Your Memory

Published in May 2012 Issue

Is it mild forgetfulness, or a more serious memory problem? The Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center offers information for seniors and family caregivers.

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Laughter Gives a Lift to People with Alzheimer’s Disease

Published in April 2012 Issue

New research sheds light on the role of laughter can play in the lives and care of persons with Alzheimer's Disease and other forms of dementia.